California Auto Insurance Laws

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California law requires that drivers have evidence of auto insurance if they are driving their own car or someone else's. People who own a vehicle but do not drive it are still obligated to have auto insurance in California.

California's Compulsory Financial Responsibility Law necessitates all drivers and owners of an automobile to be financially responsible for their actions. The statutory minimum limits of liability insurance in California are that the person responsible for an accident that results in the death or injury of one person is liable for $ 15,000, or $ 30,000 if there are multiple injuries in one accident. The responsible party is liable for $ 5,000 of property damage for any one accident.

There are four techniques to realize financial responsibility, including coverage by a motor vehicle or automobile liability insurance policy, a cash deposit of $ 35,000 with the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), a certificate of self-insurance issued by DMV to owners of fleets of more than 25 vehicles, or a surety bond for $ 35,000 obtained from an insurance company licensed to do business in California.

When a vehicle is in an accident for which the driver is established as a legally liable, bodily injury liability covers their liability to others for injuries to them, whereas property damage liability covers their liability for damage to someone else's property.

All California drivers and owners need to have at least the statutory limits of minimum liability insurance or an approved substitute method to compensate for injury or property damage they may bring about. Penalties are extremely harsh for nonconformity with this segment of the vehicle code. Comprehensive coverage (other than collision), uninsured motorist, medical payments, and collision insurance are not required by law but can be a good investment.



Source by Eric Morris